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Friday Article : Interview Coaching

26 October 2007 | Ireland | 4 Responses by Paul Mullan.

Here is the 9th part in the series from Paul Mullan of Measurability.ie. Measurability offers career coaching to individuals looking to change careers as well as companies looking to train their staff for better things. If you have a question you can either leave it here or send Paul an email at paul@measurability.ie. The other articles can be found here in our articles section.

Interview Coaching – The million dollar question

At my interview coaching sessions the most common request from the jobseeker is “what questions will come up at interview?” That is the million dollar question and the simple answer is that I don’t know. I am a career coach and not a psychic. I joke and say that if they want interview questions then Google it and they will get any amount they want. Good luck with all of them.

Know the answers and not the questions

I take a somewhat different approach when I coach jobseekers on interview preparation. I put focus on; helping the jobseeker understand what an interview is all about, helping them understand the employer and what they want, helping the individual understand themselves – their CV & unique selling points and most importantly helping them match their skills/abilities to what the employer wants. I also work on areas such as fear, confidence, body language and self belief. I feel if these foundations are in place a jobseeker will be well placed to answer any question that will arise.

Money talks

There are some questions that are guaranteed to come up and one of these is not the “million dollar question” but the “salary question”. By the way if your answer is a million dollars – I want your job. So how do you answer this question?

Managing your money questions

If you are motivated by money and that is the reason why you are on the job market and you have a figure in mind – well I guess you can answer the question quite easily. However if most people are honest money is often one of a number consideration when looking for a new job and often not the number one. If you fall into this category I recommend evasion tactics or answer the question with a question. Responses may go something like; “I am negotiable – what would a role like this pay within your organisation?” or “I am currently on x but I am open on salary depending on role and location”.

Conclusion

The salary question like a game of cards and if possible try to make the employer make the first move. If you state a salary and show your hand it may be too high and the client might come to the conclusion that they cannot afford you. But what if you suggest a figure that is below the employers? Just done yourself out of a few thousand euros.

Credits

Article by Paul Mullan of Measurability.ie. Measurability offers Career Coaching to individuals (Career Direction, CV Design & Interview Coaching) and Assessment Solutions for businesses to improve their recruitment decisions.

4 Responses

  1. Kathy said on 27 Oct 2007 at 2:26 am

    You can help your clients with the formation of their answers by knowing the basic questions that are going to be asked. But you can also help them understand how to format answers even when the question isn’t “standard.” There is a resource for helping with this at http://www.interviewcoachtrianing.com This is a complete system for coaching from a seasoned Interview Coach.

  2. paul savage said on 27 Oct 2007 at 8:02 am

    Hi Kathy, that link doesn’t work I’m afraid 🙁 But you have a fair comment.

    Actually I just looked at the link again, you spelt training wrong 😀 But it seems it’s a link to a sales product for people in the US and costs $795.00 🙁 So I won’t bother fixing the link.

  3. Paul Mullan said on 30 Oct 2007 at 11:55 am

    Thanks for you comment Kathy and please see my response to your 3 points:

    1.”You can help your clients with the formation of their answers by knowing the basic questions that are going to be asked”. Correct!! If you mean “basic” as in “what makes you suitable for this role?” the time spent identifying what the employer is looking for and how you meet those needs would certainly answer these questions. Or if you mean “basic” as in “why did you leave that job?” this would be covered in understanding your CV.

    2. “But you can also help them understand how to format answers even when the question isn’t “standard.”” – Again this would be covered by understanding and identifying what the client is looking for during a coaching session as most questions will be directed to undercover if the jobseekers has what the client wants. It is also important to help the jobseeker understand the importance of clarification and focus when answering questions at interview.

    3. “There is a resource for helping with this at http://www.interviewcoachtrianing.com This is a complete system for coaching from a seasoned Interview Coach” – This article is geared towards jobseekers and not for those wanting to become an interview coach (although they might find it interesting). I would recommend all interview coaching is face to face. As for interview coach training this is a different scenario but I cannot comment on your client and this material.

    NOTE: I had two points with the article … 1. Too much emphasis is placed on preparing answers that are textbook and sound good but DO NOT focus on the client, their requirements and challenges to their organisation and industry.

    2. How to deal with an interview question that will come up at interview – the salary question.

    Thanks for your comments

    Paul

  4. All about Interview Coaching | Irish Job News - News on Jobs for Ireland said on 9 Nov 2007 at 9:14 am

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